Nettie and celie relationship

Comparison between Nettie and Celie | TaylorHughes

nettie and celie relationship

The relationship between Shug and Celie in Alice Walker's The Color Purple is arguably the strongest in the novel. Based on Walker's theory of "womanism". In the resolution, Celie and Nettie's emotional and spiritual relationship was brought to an end. At first Celie had learned about the sinking of. The Color Purple is a epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the . Celie and Shug's relationship later develops a romantic and sexual dimension culminating in their sleeping together, this being Celie's first positive.

Corrine, noticing that her adopted children resemble Nettie, wonders if Samuel fathered the children with her. Increasingly suspicious, Corrine tries to limit Nettie's role in her family. Through her letters, Nettie reveals that she has become disillusioned with her missionary work. Corrine becomes ill with a fever. Nettie asks Samuel to tell her how he adopted Olivia and Adam.

Realizing that Adam and Olivia are Celie's children, Nettie then learns that Alphonso is actually her and Celie's stepfather. Their biological father was a store owner whom white men lynched because they resented his success. She also learns that their mother suffered a mental collapse after the death of her husband and that Alphonso exploited the situation in order to control their mother's considerable wealth.

Nettie confesses to Samuel and Corrine that she is in fact the children's biological aunt. The gravely ill Corrine refuses to believe her until Nettie reminds her of her previous encounter with Celie in the store. Later, Corrine dies, finally having accepted Nettie's story. Meanwhile, Celie visits Alphonso, who confirms Nettie's story.

Comparison between Nettie and Celie

Celie begins to lose some of her faith in God, which she confides to Shug, who explains to Celie her own unique religious philosophy. Celie, having had enough of her husband's abuse, decides to leave Mister along with Shug and Squeak, who is considering a singing career of her own. Celie puts a curse on Mister before leaving him for good.

Celie settles in Tennessee and supports herself as a seamstress.

nettie and celie relationship

She learns that Mister, suffering from a considerable decline in fortunes after Celie left him, has changed dramatically and Celie begins to call him by his first name, Albert. Albert proposes that they marry "in the spirit as well as in the flesh," but Celie declines. Alphonso dies, Celie inherits his land, and moves back into her childhood home. Around this time, Shug falls in love with Germaine, a member of her band, and this news crushes Celie. Shug travels with Germaine, all the while writing postcards to Celie.

Celie pledges to love Shug even if Shug does not love her back. Meanwhile, Nettie and Samuel marry and prepare to return to America. Before they leave, Adam marries Tashi, an African girl.

The Color Purple By Alice Walker: Relationship between Celie and Albert

Following an African tradition, Tashi undergoes the painful rituals of female circumcision and facial scarring. In solidarity, Adam undergoes the same facial scarring ritual. Just after Celie realizes that she is content in her life without Shug, Shug returns, having ended things with Germaine. Nettie and Celie embrace, having not seen each other for over 30 years.

They introduce one another to their respective families as the novel ends. Critical reception[ edit ] The Color Purple won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction inmaking Walker the first black woman to win the prize. It is 17th on the American Library Association 's list of most frequently challenged or banned books.

She is shown to have experienced abuse at the hands of men for most of her life: He later gives her away to be married to Mister, who is in love with Shug Avery, a blues singer. When Shug comes to recover from an illness in Mister and Celie's home, it leads to an intimate relationship between Celie and Shug. Shug has a significant influence on Celie, who begins to draw inspiration from Shug's independence, leading her ultimately to her own independent attitude.

Shug not only influences the way that Celie allows Mister to treat her, but also shows Celie that actions deemed sinful by others may not truly be evil or transgressive and that they do not prevent one from believing in and living for God, thereby broadening Celie's views on religion and ethics. From Shug, Celie learns that Mister, now revealed as Albert, has been hiding letters written to her by her sister Nettie, who is in Africa working as a missionary.

These letters, full of educated, firsthand observation of African life, form a moving counterpoint to Celie's life. They reveal that in Africa, just as in America, women are persistently oppressed by men. Because Nettie is prettier than Celie, who has been deemed ugly, Mister is originally interested in Nettie as a wife, but settles for Celie.

nettie and celie relationship

Nettie runs away from home to be with Celie, but is unable to stay with Celie as Mister tries to assault her sexually. As a result, Nettie leaves home and before leaving, promises to write to Celie and tells her that only death can keep them apart.

Nettie is eventually taken in by Samuel and Corrine, a missionary couple, with whom she travels to Africa as a missionary. While in Africa, Nettie becomes the caregiver of Samuel and Corrine's children and faithfully writes to Celie for decades. Nettie marries Samuel after Corrine's death and moves back to America with what are revealed to be Celie's biological children. Through explaining her experiences to Celie, Nettie encourages Celie to be more enthusiastic and optimistic about life.

Nettie finds that while there is not racial disparity in Africa, gender disparity exists. The women of the tribe are not treated as equals, and are not permitted to attend school. Shug Avery[ edit ] A sultry blues singer who first appears as Mister's mistress, Shug becomes Celie's friend and eventually her lover. Shug remains a gentle mentor who helps Celie evolve into an independent and assertive woman. At first, Shug doesn't appear to be the mothering and nurturing kind, yet she nurtures Celie physically, spiritually, and emotionally.

Shug helps Celie discover the letters from her sister Nettie that Mister had been hiding for decades.

nettie and celie relationship

In allowing Celie to view these letters, Shug supplies her with even more hope and inspiration, letting Celie see that in the end, everything works out for the best. Albert known as Mister [ edit ] Mister is the man to whom Celie is married.

Originally, he seeks a relationship with Nettie but settles for Celie. Celie's Pa tells Mister that she is ugly, tells lies, and that she'll come with a cow. Pa also tells Mister that Celie would make a better wife than Nettie.

Nettie runs away from her fathers house and she is unexpectedly reunited with Celie.

The Color Purple - Wikipedia

Nettie helps with the day to day chores that Mr. Celie appreciates how much Nettie believes in her. As is evident, Celie and Nettie share an unbreakable love for eachother. At this point in the book, Nettie has been kicked out of Mr. Because of this incident, Mr.

nettie and celie relationship

The story goes on and as Nettie promised, she writes to Celie frequently. The problem is, Celie is not receiving any of these letters.

Later on in the book, Celie discovers a hidden pile of letters from Nettie.

nettie and celie relationship

Celie and Nettie connect through these letters. These hidden letters serve as a bridge to their love for one another. Even though they are not physically together, they are emotionally and spiritually together. This is the extent of their relationship during the climax. At first Celie learns of the sinking of the boat Nettie was on.

At the end of the book, this theory that Nettie sank along with the boat turns out to be false. They are reunited once again and now can share an actual relationship without physical restraint.