A great relationship consists of the brain

Brain science to improve your relationships - Harvard Health Blog - Harvard Health Publishing

a great relationship consists of the brain

This is what a brain scientist thinks is the key to better teamwork line view that the mind is just brain activity, then relationships become icing on the cake. From a scientific point of view, integration involves energy and information— and . Spending time with friends and family is surprisingly important to brain health. When it comes to the brain and love, biological anthropologist and Kinsey “ Good relationships aren't just happier and nicer,” says Johnson.

Transference Transference is a psychological phenomenon in which conversational or relational partners activate earlier memories. As a result, we may unconsciously repeat conflicts from the past that have nothing to do with the current relationship.

a great relationship consists of the brain

For instance, you may be having an off day and may be a little short with a colleague. The colleague may snap at you in a way that is out of proportion to your actual interaction, since your manner may remind them of a conflictual and bossy relationship earlier in their lives. They may be unwarranted, but we are usually not aware of them.

What you can do: To prevent this kind of situation, introduce new self-reflections, and possibly even points of discussion when you find yourself engaged in a conflict. Emotional contagion Our emotions can be easily transferred to another person without us even knowing about this. This can also happen through large-scale social networks without in-person interactions or nonverbal cues. Interact with a disgruntled group online, and you are likely to feel disgruntled as well.

a great relationship consists of the brain

On the other hand, interacting with a positive group will probably make you feel more positive. Often, our negative emotions such as anger are transferred more easily than positive ones. The culprits responsible for this contagion in the brain are called mirror neurons.

They are specialized to automatically pick up the emotions of others. When you are interacting online, ensure that you know that whatever content you are consuming is likely to impact your mood.

a great relationship consists of the brain

See things from your partner's point of view, and let him or her know it. One brain area that lights up for people in long relationships is the area associated with empathy, Fisher says. Of course, empathy is an important element of every type of relationship, including those you have with your friends and your co-workers or employees.

Close Friends and Loving Relationships Keep the Brain Strong

But empathy is especially necessary when you're sharing your life with someone and making decisions together--inevitably, you will disagree about some important stuff and will have to work it out between you. Understanding why your partner feels different than you do and wants something other than what you want is a necessary first step to navigating those differences.

Letting your partner know that you understand is just as important.

a great relationship consists of the brain

Manage your own stress and emotions. Part of the answer: And there are many, many times when you have to refrain from saying something you're thinking because you know it won't help your partner, your relationship, or you.

Other times, you do need to express what you feel to keep the relationship alive. It takes judgment to know the difference. Focus on the positive. Fisher says that people in long relationships have heightened activity in a brain region associated with what she calls "positive illusion.

Close Friends and Loving Relationships Keep the Brain Strong

Now, I can't stress enough that positive illusion can be a very dangerous thing in certain relationships. If your partner has a harmful addiction, or is physically or emotionally abusive, or is dishonest, or endangers you in any way, then you absolutely must focus on those negative things and either resolve the issue or end the relationship. That said, Fisher is right that the way you see your relationship has a lot to do with what you choose to focus on and what you choose to ignore.

Is it more important that your partner brought you flowers or forgot to do the dishes?