Error login the trust relationship between this workstation and primary

Error: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

error login the trust relationship between this workstation and primary

Few users encouraged problem when logging to the domain, including error: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary. How to: FIX: the trust relationship between this workstation and the and you will end up getting this error when trying to logon to the server. The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed Let's try to understand what does this error means and how to fix it. domain computer login to the domain, it establish a secure channel with a.

Error: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

I hope you remember the password. Another option is to unplug the machine from the network and log in with domain user. You will be able to do disconnected authentication, but in the case of a reset machine, remember that you may have to use an old password. You need to make sure you have netdom. Where you get netdom. Windows Server and Windows Server R2 ship with netdom. Google can help you get them. For other platforms see this link: If the broken machine is a domain controller it is a little bit more complicated, but still possible to fix the problem.

Turn off the Kerberos Key Distribution Center service.

DON’T REJOIN TO FIX: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

You can do this in the Services MMC snap-in. Set the startup type to Manual. Remove the Kerberos ticket cache. A reboot will do this for you, or you can remove them using KerbTray.

You can get that tool here: Do these in conjunction with 5 below: Open an administrative command prompt.

On Windows platforms with UAC enabled, you will need to right-click on cmd.

error login the trust relationship between this workstation and primary

Type the following command: Here is more information on netdom. This problem comes up every few months for me, so I wanted to document it for my own use. Although the restore operation succeeded, it had some unforeseen consequences.

Fix "Trust relationship ..." issue without rejoining to a domain

After the restoration, all of the other servers in the domain displayed an error message at log in. This error message stated that the trust relationship between the workstation and the primary domain failed.

error login the trust relationship between this workstation and primary

You can see the actual error message in Figure 1. The reason why this problem happens is because of a "password mismatch. However, in Active Directory environments each computer account also has an internal password. If the copy of the computer account password that is stored within the member server gets out of sync with the password copy that is stored on the domain controller then the trust relationship will be broken as a result.

Fix Trust relationship failed issue without domain rejoining – TheITBros

So how can you fix this error? Unfortunately, the simplest fix isn't always the best option.

error login the trust relationship between this workstation and primary

The easy fix is to blow away the computer account within the Active Directory Users and Computers console and then rejoin the computer to the domain. Doing so reestablishes the broken-trust relationship. This approach works really well for workstations, but it can do more harm than good if you try it on a member server. The reason for this has to do with the way that some applications use the Active Directory. Take Exchange Server, for example.

Exchange Server stores messages in a mailbox database residing on a mailbox server. However, this is the only significant data that is stored locally on Exchange Server.

DON’T REJOIN TO FIX: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

All of the Exchange Server configuration data is stored within the Active Directory. In fact, it is possible to completely rebuild a failed Exchange Server from scratch aside from the mailbox database simply by making use of the configuration data that is stored in the Active Directory.

The reason why I mention this particular example is that the Exchange Server configuration data is stored within the computer object for that server. So with that in mind, imagine that a trust relationship was accidentally broken and you decided to fix the problem by deleting the Exchange Server's computer account and rejoining the computer to the domain.