Relationship between scrooge and cratchit christmas

A Christmas Carol - Wikipedia

and find homework help for other A Christmas Carol questions at eNotes. Dickens also develops the relationship between Scrooge and Bob Cratchit through. Bob Cratchit is Ebenezer Scrooge's impoverished clerk in Charles Dickens's 'A Christmas Carol.' Cratchit, who has a disabled son at home, is able to. Wikisource has original text related to this article: A Christmas Wikimedia Commons has media related to A Christmas Carol.

That night Scrooge is visited at home by Marley's ghost, who wanders the Earth entwined by heavy chains and money boxes forged during a lifetime of greed and selfishness. Marley tells Scrooge that he has a single chance to avoid the same fate: Stave two The first spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Pasttakes Scrooge to Christmas scenes of Scrooge's boyhood, reminding him of a time when he was more innocent.

The scenes reveal Scrooge's lonely childhood at boarding schoolhis relationship with his beloved sister Fan, and a Christmas party hosted by his first employer, Mr Fezziwigwho treated him like a son. Finally, they visit a now-married Belle with her large, happy family on the Christmas Eve that Marley died.

Scrooge, upset by hearing Belle's description of the man that he has become, demands that the ghost remove him from the house. Stave three The second spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Presenttakes Scrooge to a joyous market with people buying the makings of Christmas dinner and to celebrations of Christmas in a miner's cottage and in a lighthouse. Scrooge and the ghost also visit Fred's Christmas party.

A major part of this stave is taken up with Bob Cratchit's family feast and introduces his youngest son, Tiny Tima happy boy who is seriously ill. The spirit informs Scrooge that Tiny Tim will die unless the course of events changes. Before disappearing, the spirit shows Scrooge two hideous, emaciated children named Ignorance and Want. He tells Scrooge to beware the former above all and mocks Scrooge's concern for their welfare.

Stave four Scrooge and Bob Cratchit celebrate Christmas in an illustration from stave five of the original edition, The silent ghost reveals scenes involving the death of a disliked man whose funeral is attended by local businessmen only on condition that lunch is provided.

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His charwomanlaundress and the local undertaker steal his possessions to sell to a fence. When he asks the spirit to show a single person who feels emotion over his death, he is only given the pleasure of a poor couple who rejoice that his death gives them more time to put their finances in order. When Scrooge asks to see tenderness connected with any death, the ghost shows him Bob Cratchit and his family mourning the death of Tiny Tim. The ghost then allows Scrooge to see a neglected grave, with a tombstone bearing Scrooge's name.

Sobbing, Scrooge pledges to change his ways Stave five Scrooge awakens on Christmas morning a changed man.

Ghost of Christmas Past

He makes a large donation to the charity he rejected the day before, anonymously sends a large turkey to the Cratchit home for Christmas dinner and spends the afternoon with Fred's family.

The following day he gives Cratchit an increase in pay and begins to become a father figure to Tiny Tim. From then on Scrooge treats everyone with kindness, generosity and compassion, embodying the spirit of Christmas.

  • Bob Cratchit
  • Ebenezer Scrooge
  • Ghost of Christmas Present

Background Dickens at the blacking warehouse, as envisioned by Fred Barnard The writer Charles Dickens was born to a middle-class family which got into financial difficulties as a result of the spendthrift nature of his father John. In John was committed to the Marshalseaa debtors' prison in SouthwarkLondon.

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Dickens, aged 12, was forced to pawn his collection of books, leave school and work at a dirty and rat-infested shoe-blacking factory. The change in circumstances gave him what his biographer, Michael Slater, describes as a "deep personal and social outrage", which heavily influenced his writing and outlook.

Their practice was copied in many homes across the country. In the episode, a Mr Wardle relates the tale of Gabriel Grub, a lonely and mean-spirited sextonwho undergoes a Christmas conversion after being visited by goblins who show him the past and future.

It was a parliamentary report exposing the effects of the Industrial Revolution upon working class children. Horrified by what he read, Dickens planned to publish an inexpensive political pamphlet tentatively titled, An Appeal to the People of England, on behalf of the Poor Man's Child, but changed his mind, deferring the pamphlet's production until the end of the year. Sales of Martin Chuzzlewit were falling off, and his wife, Catherinewas pregnant with their fifth child.

When the audience first meet Tiny Tim, he rests upon his father's shoulder, suggesting that while the Cratchits love their boy dearly, his situation is nonetheless a burden on the family. Further representative of this burden is Tiny Tim's crippled condition. That he is crippled evokes the financial issues that many poor families faced in 19th-century England.

Although his spirit is robust, Tiny Tim's life expectancy is questionable. His crutch and iron frame support his frail body—he "bore a little crutch, and had his limbs supported by an iron frame", but more support is needed for Tim if he is to survive, as pointed out by the Ghost of Christmas Present in stave III: If these shadows remain unaltered by the future, the child will die. The relationship between Scrooge and Tiny Tim is a condensed depiction of the relationship between two social classes: Tiny Tim plays a large part in Scrooge's change.

Tiny Tim's fate is linked very closely to Scrooge's fate, which tightens the connection that Dickens establishes between the two social classes. If Scrooge does not change his miserly ways, Tiny Tim is sure to die. Likewise, if the wealthy do not do their part to support the impoverished, the impoverished are sure to struggle.