Relationship between structure and function of chloroplast mitochondria

Mitochondria and Chloroplasts – Mt Hood Community College Biology

relationship between structure and function of chloroplast mitochondria

What is the structure and function of chloroplasts? Where is the chloroplast located in a Differences Between Mitochondria and Chloroplasts. This process is based on membranes, and it enables cells to acquire energy coupling—reflecting a link between the chemical bond-forming reactions that. Structure and function of mitochondria and chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are organelles found in the broccoli's cells, along with those of other plants and algae . think host cells and bacteria formed endosymbiotic relationships long ago, when.

In the chemical bonds of glucose, the solar energy is stored. It liberates or releases oxygen. Mitochondria release energy by the breakdown of the organic food and produce carbon dioxide and water.

Energy Conversion: Mitochondria and Chloroplasts - Molecular Biology of the Cell - NCBI Bookshelf

Chloroplast helps in storing the energy and uses carbon dioxide and water to make glucose energy. Mitochondria are the site of beta oxidative, photorespiration, oxidative phosphorylation, ETC. The chloroplast is the site of the photorespiration and photosynthesis. The mitochondria are the bean or rod-shaped structure.

Compare and Contrast: Chloroplasts and Mitochondria

The diameter ranges from 0. In a cell, the number of mitochondria present depends on the metabolic requirements of that particular cell and therefore it can be thousand or a few. It is the double membrane structure, the outer and the inner membrane.

The outer membrane is made up of lipid and protein phospholipid bilayers and is highly permeable, though protecting the organelle also. The inner membrane is also made up of lipid and protein.

relationship between structure and function of chloroplast mitochondria

The inner membrane is folded to form cristae, and the internal chamber is called as the matrix. In the process of synthesizing energy that is ATP, the mitochondria use the oxygen and nutrients, this process is called as Aerobic respiration. This is the much more efficient way of producing ATP than in anaerobic respiration.

Apart from the synthesis of energy for the cell, mitochondria also help in cell signalling, regulation of cell cycle, cell growth, cell death, as well in cellular differentiation.

relationship between structure and function of chloroplast mitochondria

The exception is the mature mammalian red blood cells, where mitochondria are absent. It is believed that mitochondria used to exist as the independent prokaryotic cell once. But due to the process of endosymbiosis, they got engulfed and became the part of the eukaryotic cell.

Mitochondria

This is the reason, that why mitochondria contain its own DNA, and shows similarity with the prokaryotic cell bacteria. They are oval-shaped and have two membranes: Electron micrograph of a mitochondrion, showing matrix, cristae, outer membrane, and inner membrane.

Modification of work by Matthew Britton; scale-bar data from Matt Russell. The matrix contains mitochondrial DNA and ribosomes. We'll talk shortly about why mitochondria and chloroplasts have their own DNA and ribosomes. The multi-compartment structure of the mitochondrion may seem complicated to us. That's true, but it turns out to be very useful for cellular respirationallowing reactions to be kept separate and different concentrations of molecules to be maintained in different "rooms.

These electrons are captured by special molecules called electron carriers and deposited into the electron transport chaina series of proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. As protons flow back down their gradient and into the matrix, they pass through an enzyme called ATP synthase, which harnesses the flow of protons to generate ATP.

This process of generating ATP using the proton gradient generated by the electron transport chain is called oxidative phosphorylation. The compartmentalization of the mitochondrion into matrix and intermembrane space is essential for oxidative phosphorylation, as it allows a proton gradient to be established.

Electrons from fuel molecules, such as the sugar glucose, are stripped off in reactions that take place in the cytosol and in the mitochondrial matrix. These electrons are captured by special molecules called electron carriers and deposited into the electron transport, a series of proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

For instance, muscle cells typically have high energy needs and large numbers of mitochondria, while red blood cells, which are highly specialized for oxygen transport, have no mitochondria at all.

Mitochondria and chloroplasts (article) | Khan Academy

Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain their own DNA and ribosomes. Strong evidence points to endosymbiosis as the answer to the puzzle.

relationship between structure and function of chloroplast mitochondria

Symbiosis is a relationship in which organisms from two separate species live in a close, dependent relationship. The first endosymbiotic event occurred: The ancestral eukaryote consumed aerobic bacteria that evolved into mitochondria.

In a second endosymbiotic event, the early eukaryote consumed photosynthetic bacteria that evolved into chloroplasts. Bacteria also have DNA and ribosomes similar to those of mitochondria and chloroplasts. Symbiosis is a relationship in which organisms from two separate species live in close association and typically exhibit specific adaptations to each other.

Endosymbiotic relationships abound in nature. Microbes that produce vitamin K live inside the human gut. This relationship is beneficial for us because we are unable to synthesize vitamin K. It is also beneficial for the microbes because they are protected from other organisms and are provided a stable habitat and abundant food by living within the large intestine. Scientists have long noticed that bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts are similar in size. We also know that mitochondria and chloroplasts have DNA and ribosomes, just as bacteria do.

Scientists believe that host cells and bacteria formed a mutually beneficial endosymbiotic relationship when the host cells ingested aerobic bacteria and cyanobacteria but did not destroy them. Through evolution, these ingested bacteria became more specialized in their functions, with the aerobic bacteria becoming mitochondria and the photosynthetic bacteria becoming chloroplasts.

OpenStax, Concepts of Biology.